Special Hobby Aug 2021 Update

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1/72 7,5 cm PaK 40 ‘German Anti-tank Gun’
The PaK 40 is arguably one of the most important German anti-tank weapons of the war. Our 1/72 model shows the gun in the wheeled version. Between 1939 and 1945 a total of more than 20,000 examples were built. They were used both with a wheeled chassis or mounted on a wide variety of Wehrmacht military vehicles. The gun was also exported to many German allies. It saw deployment on all fronts where the Wehrmacht fought. Its service with the military did not ceased with the end of the war though. Many of them were captures and found their way to a couple of countries. The very last war the gun saw was most possibly the conflict in Vietnam where they were used against US vessels (the captured PaK 40s had been delivered to Vietnamese communists by the Soviet Union).
The kit offers the 7.5cm PaK 40 in colours of the Wehrmacht, Slovak Army, Finnish Army, Czechoslovak Army and the Vietnamese Army. The parts come on a single sprue and the kit can be built as if just being towed or in the firing position with the chassis arms wide apart.

Finely detailed and yet very simple model
Choice of colour schemes of several armies

1/72 Dornier Do 27 “German, Spanish and Belgian Service” 
In the post war year, many German aircraft designers feared the possible ban on aircraft production and begun to leave the country. Among them also Claudius Dornier Jr., the son of the famous German WW2 aircraft builder. He settled in Spain where he founded company named Oficinas Técnicas Dornier (OTEDO). In the middle 50’s, the Spanish Air Ministry was looking for a new STOL aircraft and having received the order, Dornier designed the Dornier Do 25 type, a high wing aircraft for a crew of four. Two prototype airframes were built by CASA company in Spain, while in Germany, in rebuilt Dornier works, the type was redesigned to the Do 27, powered by the Lycoming GSO-480-B1B6 engine. This type was also finally put into production, becoming the first aircraft to be mass-produced in Germany after the war. In total, 428 airframes were built in several different versions and they were operated by all three services of the newly built German military, ie the air force, navy and land forces. At the same time, a 50-unit batch was also produced in Spain for their military, named the CASA C-127/U.9. The type’s many versions differed mainly by the style of the undercarriage, engine and propeller used, the shape of the tail fin or by having either single or twin controls in the cockpit. The Dornier Do 27 was not only used by air forces of many European countries, namely by Portugal, Belgium, Sweden, Switzerland and some others, but also elsewhere over the globe. It could be seen flying in several African countries, in the State of Israel and also in Turkey. The type found its way to civil aviation market too and was quite liked by so-called bush pilots for its excellent performance in harsh conditions of irregular transport lines in Africa or South America. In Europe, the Do 27 served as touring or skydiving aircraft.

This nicely detailed model originates in steel moulding tools and comes on four sprues of grey styrene and one sprue of clear parts which can be attached also in open position – meaning both the front cockpit door and the large fuselage window on either side of the fuselage to nicely show the busy interior of the model.

The decal sheet offers markings for three machines. The German option portrays a machine in standard camouflage with high visibility orange wing tips, rudder and cowling panels and what makes her even more interesting, with black and white stripped propeller. The two other options is a Belgian plane olive overall and a Spanish one in aluminium over pale blue as it was operated in the Spanish Sahara.

1/72 A.W. Meteor NF Mk.14 ‘The Last of Night Fighters’
The Meteor NF Mk.14 night / all weather jet fighters were desingned as a rather urgently needed replacement of the piston-engine powered Mosquitoes. In the 1950s, the Soviet, nuclear weapons armed bombers posed a very real threat. The last versions of this all-wweather fighter, the Mk.14 introduced many improvements of its airframe based on experience gained by oprating the earlier Meteor versions. Comparing with them, the Mk.14 featured much simplified, rear-slid canopy hood with almost no framing. The RAF operated this final Meteor verison both from the home and overseas bases.
The kit offers five grey styrene sprues and a single clear parts sprue with two styles of the windshield. The decal sheet contains markings for four machines including a full set of the airframe stencilling. There are marking schemes for three RAF machines, one of which flew from Malaya-located bases, the other two were based in Britain. For local customers might be of great significance that onr of the British-based aiframes was flown by a Czech pilot S/L Miro Liškutín. The fourth colour option is a French machine used by the CEV test centre.

Superbly detailed model
No other kit of this version on the market, except for the rather ancient Matchbox
Camouflage options you will find difficult to chose only one from.

Paul Tosney – Editor

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